The Liberation of Celia Kahn

J. David Simons

J. David Simons is the author of five novels, as well as several short stories and essays. The Credit Draper was shortlisted for the McKitterick Prize and he has received bursaries and writing fellowships from three prestigious organisations. His acclaimed novel An Exquisite Sense of What Is Beautiful was published by Saraband in 2013.

The Liberation of Celia Kahn

by J. David Simons

  • RRP: £8.99 (print) / £4.99 (ebook)
  • Format: Paperback
  • ISBN: 9781908643841
  • Ebook ISBN: 9781908643865

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Glasgow 1915. Set against the background of rent strikes, anti-war sentiment and a revolution brewing in Russia, a young Jewish woman from the Gorbals discovers a taste for protest, female solidarity, and the empowerment of women made possible by birth control. Her political sensibilities are fired up even further by a personal trauma, while a new love affair presents difficult choices.

REVIEWS OF The Liberation of Celia Kahn

'“Entertaining and compelling. Explores so many stimulating political themes.'” -– Alan Lloyd, Morning Star

'“Informative, entertaining and uplifting. Highly recommended”.' - Janet Williamson, Historical Novel Society Review Read more

'“A rare evocation of the immigrant novel, with a welcome Scottish dimension.”' -– Clive Sinclair, The Jewish Chronicle. Read more

'“Celia'’s pain and challenges are sensitively rendered, her passion and stoicism enchanting. A quietly brilliant book.'” - Rebecca Isherwood, The Skinny

'“[It is] a joy to find a novel which is such an entertaining and compelling read [and] faithful to the history of the times.'” - Alan Lloyd, Morning Star

'This is a thoughtful, neat and plucky book, much like its heroine. J. David Simons is brilliant at capturing the little oddities and foibles of his characters. The book is a riotous celebration of female empowerment.' - Lisa Glass, Vulpes Libris Read more

"Emotive, this is a thought-provoking piece of fictionalised social history." - Alastair Mabbott, The Herald

“'A compelling tale with characters who imprint themselves on the streets of Glasgow”.' - Scarlett McGwire, The Tribune