Hare

Jim Crumley

Jim Crumley has written more than thirty books, mostly on the wildlife and wild landscape of his native Scotland. The first instalment of his Seasons series, The Nature of Autumn, was longlisted for the Wainwright Golden Beer Book Prize 2017 and shortlisted for the Richard Jefferies Society and White Horse Bookshop Literary Prize 2017. The follow-up to that book is the stunning The Nature of Winter. The third in the series, The Nature of Spring, was Radio 4’s Book of the Week. The Nature of Summer, the final book of  Seasons, will be published later this year by Saraband.

The Eagle’s Way was shortlisted for a prestigious Saltire Society award, and his Encounters in the Wild series – which sees Jim get up close and personal with Britain’s favourite animals – has found him many new readers. He has also recently written about the return of the beaver to the UK’s wetlands in Nature’s Architect (Saraband, 2015).

Jim is a widely published journalist and has a monthly column in The Scots Magazine, as well as being a poet and occasional broadcaster on both radio and television.

Hare

by Jim Crumley

  • RRP: £10 (print)
  • Format: Hardback
  • ISBN: 9781910192139

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Buy Hare

In the encounters in the wild series, renowned nature writer Jim Crumley gets up close and personal with British wildlife: here, the hare. With his inimitable passion and vision, he relives memorable encounters with some of our best-loved native species, offering intimate insights into their extraordinary lives. “The moon climbed high above the trees beyond the far side of the field, contriving a night of raw, primitive beauty out of the still-lingering wisps of mist, the pale, tumbling curves of field, the parallel inked-in blue-black curves of the hedges, the quiet and surprisingly pale shades of the distant firth. Tawny owls stabbed at the darkness with sharp, two-syllable shrieks. Then there was a hare, far down the field. It ran easily out into the moonlight from the hedge on the far side and at once it was partnered in dance by its own giant shadow.”